Tag: Dressage

Jessie Smith & Northern Storm

Jessie Smith & Northern Storm

Meet Jessie Smith South Australian dressage and show rider, who also happens to be the first Australian featured rider! At just 18 and 21 Jessie and Storm respectively have already achieved some big things. Her recent accomplishments include finishing in the top 10 at the Interschool National […]

My 2018 Riding Goals

My 2018 Riding Goals

There is something promising about the new year. It’s an opportunity to start afresh, set your sights on new things and new journeys. I love pouring over the competition calendar at the start of each year and planning for the coming year. A really important […]

The Blonde & The Bay

The Blonde & The Bay

Last week we got to know Maddie Bricken, how she came to riding, what she loves about the sport of dressage and much more. This week is all about Leah the other half of The Blonde & The Bay.

Tell us about how Leah came into your life?

I’ll try to explain this heartfelt story without becoming an emotional sap… I guess you could say that I’ve “kissed a lot of toads” prior to finding Leah. In 2012, I was ready to make a big transition in my riding career. You know, the large step from competing Training/First level to setting goals like earning my USDF Bronze Medal and dabbling in the more difficult movements. Making the Region 9 Team for the 2013 North American Junior Young Rider Championships was also becoming a huge driving factor to advance. During the summer of ’12, I was able to find a very nice schoolmaster that would be my ticket to furthering my riding, or so I thought. The first time I rode him in Texas, I landed in the sand within 10 minutes. Naturally, I didn’t think much of the situation as this was horseback riding and we all know they’re unpredictable creatures. We continued on to an almost undefeated fall season, but I could never feel 100% comfortable while on his back.

During a competition in October of 2012, a strong cold front had blown through Saturday night, leaving Sunday full of spooking horses, blustery, 20mph winds, and a 40-degree temperature drop. Scratching my first class, I told myself I was going in for my Fourth Level Test 1 in order to obtain that second fourth level score towards my USDF Silver. In the warm up, I was trotting my horse long and low in hopes of warming his back slowly and properly. I didn’t make it a full time around the arena before he dramatically spooked, dropping his shoulder and bolting to the right. My weight shifted and I was able to reposition myself within the saddle, but before I could blink, all I remember was seeing his neck and head go to the ground – I was flying through the air in a crowded warm up arena. He bucked, violently. Hitting the ground hurt, badly. My hip made contact with the Otto-Sport footing first, followed by my head and neck (thank GOODNESS for my helmet!!!). I blacked out, and was brought back to my senses when I heard the shrill shout of “loose horse.”

Everything changed dramatically for me after this point. Whiplash, a concussion, and severe bruising – I stood in front of the bathroom mirror and couldn’t help but cry at my black and blue hips, shoulders, and neck. As I wiped the tears from my cheeks, a new feeling went piercing through my mind. Fear. I was scared, and my confidence was broken. For months after this accident, I tried to swallow my feelings and ride, but inevitably, the horse and I were not clicking in the ways I had hoped. The most defeating moment was when I was too terrified to be on my own, and my trainer or mother would have to lead me around like a pony ride. I had reached a point in my life where I was afraid of horses, and after my parents made the decision to sell the horse; I was convinced that my dressage career was over.

I was wrong, because who are we kidding? Even after they cause us bodily harm, we can never stay away from horses too long.

The moment the Blonde & The Bay met

In August of 2013, I received an invitation from W Farms in Chino Hills, California, to spend a week of riding under the SoCal sun in hopes of finding my forever-equine partner. The owners and staff at W Farms have become like family over the years, and I’m eternally grateful for everything they’ve done for me. While still quite shaken and horridly timid, deep down, there was no way I could let my fear override my love for the horse. I was bound and determined to put my foot back in the stirrup, no matter how long the process would take.

The first day at W Farms, I walked down the barn isle only to see a bright, mahogany red horse with a symmetrical blaze standing patiently in the crossties. Instantly, I was drawn to her, and I asked if I could try her first. She studied me as much as I studied her, and when I went to stroke her neck, she sighed – that I will never forget.

Leah and I instantly clicked, and I wish I could formulate the feeling into words. Her surefootedness was uncanny, staying steady, calm, and most importantly, confident in herself throughout my rides that week in California. She allowed me to make mistakes without becoming flustered or annoyed, something she still does to this day. By the end of my stay in W Farms, I knew I wouldn’t be returning to Texas without her. In September of 2013, I was unloading Leah onto our property, and the rest has been history.

I was wrong, because who are we kidding? Even after they cause us bodily harm, we can never stay away from horses too long. Click To Tweet

Over the last 14 months you and Leah have gone from competing at third level to Inter 1, and this was on the back of a period of time where you didn’t compete. Can you tell us a bit about this journey?

What a journey it has been, holy cow! As I mentioned before, Leah lived in the barn on our home property once arriving from California. Having her at the house for a little over a year allowed me to really become familiar with all of her quirks and personality traits. I always had it in my mind that I wouldn’t compete with her until I fully knew her, given my previous history, and I think that’s really played a heavy hand in our progression and successes over the last handful of months.

The blonde & The Bay in the competition arena

My first show was 3 years into owning her, and I won’t lie, I was very nervous. We debuted at third level in 2016, and we didn’t score particularly great, my nerves mostly to blame. Upon moving back to San Antonio from Corpus Christi, I reunited with my longtime friends and trainers, husband and wife team, Eva and Joshua Tabor. I moved Leah to their beautiful facility last fall, and that was the beginning of our development as a true partnership. I set my goal of earning my USDF Silver Medal and making the jump to the FEI levels in 2017, so we went to work.

Riding at the FEI level is a whole different ball game than competing at third or fourth level. Every single movement, heck, every single breath is being judged within those white plastic show ring walls, and the attention to detail is overwhelming. Throughout the journey, we spent the majority of our training sessions chipping away on having Leah connected through her back. I lost count how many transitions we schooled, and I get dizzy when I think about all the lateral exercises we pushed through in order to help quicken Leah’s hind leg. However, the one factor that was the hardest to grasp was maintaining steadiness in the bridle. This took months, literally, months to achieve! There were times when I thought I would never grasp the concept, but slowly and surely, her fussiness started to retreat. Having Eva and Joshua by my side to encourage, push, and help us has been the biggest blessing I could ever imagine. Over the last year, I’ve watched Leah transform into a true FEI horse, and while we still have our moments, she’s reached the point in her life where she is fun to ride. Most of the time, anyway, after all, she is an opinionated mare. The journey involved a lot, I mean a LOT of work, time, patience, dedication and determination, but the fruits of our labor have been worth the tired muscles and blistered fingers.

You’ve had an amazing 2017 seasons, what has been the highlight of 2017?

The moment the Blonde & The Bay met

I am humbled when I think about what we accomplished this year. 2017 was hands down my most successful season to date; it was a truly incredible experience. There are so many highlights that I could list – number one would be earning my USDF Silver Medal during our PSG debut competition, which happened to be a CDI show with international judges sitting in the box, even with mistakes during our test! It’s also been a huge goal of mine to win a USDF Regional Championship, so when the show volunteer put that tri-colored champion ribbon around Leah’s neck for the Intermediate I AA class at Regionals this year, I cried.

Receiving our invite to compete at the US Dressage Finals was truly the cherry on the sundae… Just to be grouped in with the best horse/rider combinations in the country made up for the fact that we were not able to make the trip to compete. Having said all of this, the biggest highlight for me this year was finally reaching the point I had always dreamed about with Leah, and within my riding career. I feel as if we are closer than ever, and having this type of relationship with a horse is a pinch-me worthy experience. That mare is so much more than just a mare; so much more than just a horse. She has given me so much, but most importantly, she’s given me confidence and self-esteem in everyday life. So, not only has this been a highlight of 2017, it’s been the highlight for the last 4 years with her.

 

What are your goals with Leah? Where to from here?

Leah will be 17 years old this coming July, and I am well aware that she is reaching the latter part of her competitive career. With that on the brain, for 2018, I’ll go another season at Intermediate I with a Freestyle to showcase for the year. I’d like to qualify for the Regionals in both of these tests, as well as earn yet another invite to the US Dressage Finals – we will make the trip to Kentucky next year should we earn our designated score or placing! We’ve started to play around with the Grand Prix movements, although she is not confirmed in the one-time changes, piaffe or passage. Riding down the GP centerline would be a dream come true, but the reality of Leah actually being solid in all the movements is a long shot. I’ve started to mentally prepare myself that our FEI journey might come to a close within the next few years, and at that point, I’d love to hand her off to my mother. It would be so incredibly special to watch the two of them compete at the lower levels – who knows, maybe Leah could pilot my mom to her USDF Bronze Medal. How special would that be?

I haven’t quite wrapped my mind around what’s next in my life after my competitive streak with Leah comes to an end… and naturally, I haven’t wanted to. All I know is that it’s always been a huge goal of mine to develop a young horse from the beginning stages…

The Blonde & The Bay

You can follow Maddie and Leah’s journey on Instagram @theblondeandthebay_ and on their blog The Blonde and The Bay

Aphrodite Tech Stirrups – Product Review

Aphrodite Tech Stirrups – Product Review

 I’d had been looking at my old stirrup irons for quite some time, (which I’d had for more than 10 years) wondering if I should bite the bullet and invest in a new pair. When my birthday came around and my parents weren’t too sure […]

2017 – A year in Review – Equestrian Blog Hop

2017 – A year in Review – Equestrian Blog Hop

2017 was a whirlwind of changes to in my career and a different focus in my riding. A promotion at work saw my professional life ramp up. With Nonie and I being between elementary and medium level, competing took a back seat and the focus […]

A clinic with Danielle Keogh

A clinic with Danielle Keogh

Last weekend I attended a clinic with my coach Danielle Keogh. As well as being an incredible dressage rider and coach, Dani is also an experienced physiotherapist. I believe that her deep understanding of anatomy and biomechanics gives her a unique perspective as a trainer. It’s also probably not particularly surprising that she has a keen eye for rider position. While my position is far from perfect (in reality it is probably at a level which could best be described as adequate), it has improved significantly since I started training with Dani. Lessons with Dani are always hard work, but they are also rewarding. She helps me to unlock Nonie’s best work and continue to build upon it. This weekend we focused improving the quality of Nonie’s canter.

 

evidence of how hard we worked in our lessons
My boots provided the evidence of just how hard we had worked during our lessons last weekend.

The warm up

We started with some relatively simple exercises. My favourite of which is leg yielding off the outside rein and changing the flexion. Nonie has a tendency to load up her outside shoulder particularly in canter right, so leg yeilding off the outside rein really helps with this. This makes riding lateral work and smaller figures a challenge. The key thing for me to keep in mind during this exercise is to make sure Nonie is responsive in moving off my outside leg. Changing the flexion slightly from the inside to the outside helps to keep supple in the neck and prevent her from bracing against me.

The Canter Pirouette’s

The clinic before last we began work on the canter pirouette’s. In our last lot of lessons we had to take a step back and work on getting Nonie more through and lighter in the front end. This remains a work in progress, but we seem to have made enough progress, that we were able to resume work on the piri’s. One of the main exercises that we are using to help develop her ability to sit and increase her strength, is cantering on a 10m circle and asking for quarters in whilst maintaining the inside bend and flexion. These are by no means an easy movement for Nonie, and we are only in the very early stages but when we get it for a few strides it truly feels amazing.

The Flying Changes

Recently I have felt that Nonie has been anticipating the flying changes. During these lessons Dani emphasised the importance of riding through the lines which I use to set Nonie up for the change. BUT to only ride a change when she stays relaxed through the line. We also worked on a new exercise to help get Nonie ‘hotter’ off my outside leg. The goal of this exercise is to have Nonie really responsive to the aids for the change.

The Short Steps

We began a little work on the short steps. The reason for introducing these was again to help Nonie sit more and increase her strength. I’ve done a little work on these before with a coach helping me from the ground. This time it was all down to me, of course with Dani helping me to find the right feel, when to ask for more compression and when to ride out of it. The few steps that we were able to achieve felt pretty incredible. Now I get to work on these at home too!

The Sunday night after my lessons, in addition to rubbing my sore shoulders and relaxing my abs, I made sure to write down some notes about what we had worked on. This is something that over the years I have found helps me to get the most out of my lessons. My first ride since the lessons was on Monday afternoon, and I felt a little awkward. As the week has gone on we have felt less awkward and I can feel the improvements in our work.

A clinic with Danielle Keogh

EquiMind Online Dressage Competitions

EquiMind Online Dressage Competitions

In June, Nonie and I were fortunate enough to be selected for sponsorship by online equestrian competition company EquiMind. The British based company cater for riders across a variety of disciplines including dressage, showing horsemanship and western vaulting and even have specialised classes for blind […]

The other equestrian athlete

The other equestrian athlete

Our horses are athletes and we care for them accordingly. But what about us riders? I couldn’t help but ponder this question as I watched Nonie fall asleep under the therapeutic touch of our incredible equine body worker Penny. While my horse gets fairly regular […]

Super Staples – Samshield Helmet Review

Super Staples – Samshield Helmet Review

As one of my favourite instagramers @joful_dressage once asked, “Is it wrong to love an inanimate object”? Well I am not sure that she ever had that question answered. I do know however, that I am in love with my new Samshield.

As anyone who knows me will attest, this is nothing short of a miracle. My life as an equestrian has been made somewhat less comfortable by my oddly shaped head coupled with my inability to find a helmet which works with this. I guess this is somewhat ironic as I am a huge advocate for wearing helmets, each and every time, a riders swing their leg over a horse.

Samshield Helmets

In 2016, thinking I was onto a winner I handed over an ungodly amount of money for a Casco helmet.  I was pretty upset when I found out that the helmet would no longer be ‘competition legal’ due to the updated safety standards. Early in 2017, I proceed to purchase a new competition legal Casco. I’d been assured that the design had not changed. But alas it had changed rather significantly and no longer fit my head. So the search for my ‘Cinderella helmet’ began once again. It was on my recent trip down south that I found my perfect match – helmet wise that is!

Here’s what makes the Samshield is such a great helmet.

  1. Light weight.

    One of the first things that you will notice when you pick this helmet up is just how light it is. You could be forgiven for forgetting it is on your head.

  2. Ventilation. 

    The first couple of rides I had in my Samshield were really windy days. The sensation of air swirling around was somewhat bizarre. However after a few weeks riding in this helmet, removing my helmet without my hair being plastered to my head with sweat was rather refreshing. I know that moving into summer in a much cooler helmet will make riding a lot more pleasant. But don’t worry if you live in a colder climate, there is a warm liner option too!

  3. Elegance.

    In matters of style I’ll take elegance and simplicity over flash any day of the week. As such it is no surprise that The Samshield is right down my alley. All of the Samshield helmets have beautiful lines, from the line over the top of the helmet, to the harness of the helmet.

  4. Velcro chin strap.

    This is a feature that I initially thought looked a bit odd. Having ridden in this helmet for a few weeks, I realise that this feature is nothing short of genius. If I had a dollar for every time I had to tighten the chin strap on any other helmet, I’d be rich! Hmm not quite… Nonetheless, I love the fact that the strap holding the helmet on my head does not budge!

  5. Countless options for customisation.

    While I went with the Navy Shadowmatt sans Swarovski crystals, a quick browse of the My Samshield page highlights just how many options there are to customise these already beautiful helmets. http://www.samshield.com/configurator/

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It’s safe to say the next helmet I buy will also be a Samshield.

Great Equestrian Reads

Great Equestrian Reads

Ok, confession time, I am a total bookworm. Or at least I am now that I have wrestled my way out from under the mountain of text books and journal articles that were common place during the days of my undergraduate degree. Since I was […]


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